Latest News

Stand by for derision from global warming sceptics. It has long been one of their most favoured - and, at first sight, most telling - debating points that some scientists, apparently inconsistently, attribute both extreme hot and cold weather to the climate change. But now a new study has come up with findings as to why this may indeed be valid.
Cold, white, forever icy - the Antarctic should be the last place to melt in a warming climate. But a new study shows the ice continent could become the major contributor to sea level rise before the end of the century.
Sea levels will continue to rise in the western tropical Pacific Ocean due to human activities, according to a new study by the Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder. Through the study, the researchers wanted to determine the role of naturally-occurring climate phenomenon called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation or PDO in influencing sea rise patterns in the Pacific.

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Welcome to Climate Change Monitoring

The RSOE EDIS Climate Change Monitoring Services is taking steps to bring this evidence to the public's attention, with the goal of building support for action to reduce the heat-trapping gas emissions that cause global warming. We have developed - and always updated - a world map, viewable online and also available as an Online Maps, that shows where the fingerprints and harbingers of global warming have occurred in recent years. By showing the local consequences of climate change, it brings the message home effectively.

Frustrated because a friend or colleague says global warming is the future's problem?

Compelling new evidence demonstrates that global warming is already under way with consequences that must be faced today as well as tomorrow. The evidence is of two kinds:

  • Fingerprints of global warming are indicators of the global, long-term warming trend observed in the historical record. They include heat waves, sea-level rise, melting glaciers and warming of the poles.
  • Harbingers are events that foreshadow the impacts likely to become more frequent and widespread with continued warming. They include spreading disease, earlier spring arrival, plant and animal range shifts, coral reef bleaching, downpours, and droughts and fires.

Climate Change events

Weather Clouds